The Mises Institute and Open Borders

by Alex Gore

I’ve been growing more and more aware that the Libertarian movement is Jewish and specifically serves Jewish interests. Prominent libertarians such as Ludwig Von Mises, Murray Rothbard, Alisa Rosenbaum (Ayn Rand), and Stefan Molyneux are all Jews and all against migration controls. The Mises Institute just issued an article that states that immigration restriction is akin to individual US states restricting Americans from other states:

If it is sound to erect a barrier along our national boundary lines, against those who see greater opportunities here than in their native land, why should we not erect similar barriers between states and localities within our nation? – Murray Rothbard

This however is an apples to oranges comparison. Historically, borders have been demarcated along racial, religious, and linguistic lines. And for good reasons. Open borders is an invitation to loss of culture and ethnicity, something your ancestors have worked for many centuries to maintain. I am all for free trade and trading with our neighbors. However, people belong to where they came from.

Early Americans, whom were largely WASPS (white anglo-saxon protestants), felt it was a God given right for homogeneity in America to be maintained. Since they made the largest contributions to the development of the country, they believed they had every right to determine the direction of it. They believed things were fine the way they were and saw no need for radical changes. The sort of immigration that was to be permitted should only be limited to those of their own kind. Even immigration of Italians, Irish, and Eastern Europeans, though white, were looked upon with suspicion as they could be a threat to the general order of things. Protecting one’s kind is actually a fundamental part of evolution to avoiding extinction. There is a need to keep a tab on who gets to come in and who doesn’t. Really the only type of migrants that a country should allow should be people who share the same beliefs, ideas, and ethnicity. I can’t think of a more peaceful solution.

Immigration policy is a paradigmatic example of conflicts of interest between ethnic groups because immigration policy determines the future demographic composition of the nation. Ethnic groups unable to influence immigration policy in their own interests will eventually be displaced by groups able to accomplish this goal. Immigration policy is thus of fundamental interest to an evolutionist. (Kevin MacDonald, Culture of Critique, pg 240)

The type of people who’ve shaped Western immigration policy have been Jews. They have historically been behind mass immigration against the wishes of the native people. It doesn’t matter whether they are left-wing or right-wing Jews. George Soros, Ayn Rand, Barbara Spectre, and David Horowitz have been advocates of open orders and race mixing for the West but are staunchly against it for Israel – a clear double standard.

The article continues:

(L)inguistic and cultural majorities have a habit of using the political system to exploit the linguistic and cultural minorities. As these majorities change due to migration, this can lead to political conflict. For Mises, the answer to this was more fluidity in borders, and the use of secession and decentralization as tools in minimizing the power held by majority groups over minority groups. – Ryan McMaken

The type of minorities that the Institute is most interested in protecting are Jews. Again, they have historically been advocates of open borders.

At the intellectual level, Jewish intellectuals led the battle against the idea that races even exist and against the idea that there are differences in intelligence or cultural level between the races that are rooted in biology. They also spearheaded defining America as a set of abstract principles rather than an ethnocultural civilization. At the level of politics, Jewish organizations spearheaded the drive to open up immigration to all of the peoples of the world. Jewish organizations also played a key role in furthering the interests of other racial and ethnic minorities, and they led the legal and legislative effort to remove Christianity from public places. (MacDonald, C of C, page xx)

Ethnic and religious pluralism serves external Jewish interests because Jews become one of many ethnic groups. This results in the diffusion of political and cultural influence among the various ethnic and religious groups, and it becomes difficult or impossible to develop unified, cohesive groups of gentiles united in their opposition to Judaism. We have seen that historically, major anti-Semitic movements have tended to erupt in societies that have been, apart from the Jews, religiously or ethnically homogeneous. Ethnically and religiously pluralistic societies are thus more likely to satisfy Jewish interests than are societies characterized by ethnic and religious homogeneity among gentiles. (MacDonald, Separation and Its Discontents, p332)

Estate Sale Finds – Religious and Conspiracy Books

This past April I went to the mega Gainesville FL Friends of the Library (FOL) sale. This is one of the largest and best known books sales in the country and they hold a couple sales per year. Here are some of the books I got. (each of the images below are clickable)

All three Abrahamic religions represented here:

… hmm Insect Diets?

The first book is Spagyrics: The Alchemical Preparation of Medicinal Essences, Tinctures, and Elixirs. The second book is There is No Death & There Are No Dead: Evidence of Survival and Spirit Communication through the Voice and Images from Those on the Other Side. The fourth book is The Symbolic Prophecy of the Great Pyramid.

I read most of this book which was published in 1988. It which highlights the housing and building architecture of the new African-American settlers in Liberia. The buildings borrowed much from the American South where they came from. Lot of the blacks arrived just after slavery ended though some arrived as freed men in the early 19th century. These blacks decided to build better lives for themselves (or so they hoped) and escape white rule in America. Though many were disappointed at the conditions in Liberia, some staked out a reasonable life. The new settlers ruled the country until the coup in 1980. The country has been in chaos ever since.

These all below came from an estate sale in Deland. Morals and Dogma is a Freemasonry book. Albion’s Seed explains the four geographical areas of England where early British Americans originated from. And The Underground History of American Education was written by John Taylor Gatto. He is well known for exposing government schooling.

Alex Drone

Syria – Bosra and Daraa

Bosra was my very last destination in Syria. It is an ancient Roman city located in the southernmost region of Syria near the Jordan border. It was only about an hour and a half from Damascus. The ancient Citadel below:

Kids playing soccer:

When I left Bosra, it was evening and getting dark. The buses were not running to Damascus at that time. I tried hitchhiking, but without luck. Fortunately a young man came out of his house nearby and offered me a night at his family’s home. He spoke some English. Though people are friendly in Syria overall, there is even more hospitality down in the country. I slept on this couch:

And had dinner:

The next morning, he offered to give me a tour of nearby Daraa. We took a taxi ride there. If this city sounds familiar, it had made international headlines just a couple weeks prior for violent uprisings. You could even say the very start of the war in Syria was in Daraa.

At the time, the city was calm. I didn’t notice much in the way of damage. It looked like things were back to normal.

Inside a cafe in Daraa:

Train depot:

The young man took me to a community pool next. He showed me a photo of his cousin, who died in the Daraa fighting just recently:

In the afternoon, I thanked the young man and left for Damascus. I stayed in Damascus for a couple nights and then took a train ride to Aleppo the next afternoon. It was night when I arrived and fairly late. I then took a taxi to the Turkish border and another taxi from the border back to same hotel in Antakya that I stayed a couple months before. It was about 4:00 in the morning. Syria ended up being a memorable trip, but I had little idea how significant this trip would be in light of the events the country has seen since.

Coming up next: Lebanon

Syria – Mar Musa Monastery

Mar Musa was among the last place I went during my Syrian trip. This was back in June 2011. Mar Musa is an ancient Christian monastery located about an hour north of Damascus. It is one of the few surviving monasteries in the Middle East and dates from the 11th century. The monastery is perched on top of a cliff in a very remote area. Me and a group of three others went together from the hotel in Damascus to the monastery. They gave us free meals and accommodation for the night we were there. We attended service in the afternoon. It was an interesting experience.

Syrian Catholic Priest

This German man has stayed at the monastery on and off for months. He wants to become a priest.

Lunch. The lady at rear is from Ontario and to her left is from Oregon. they traveled together.

Dinner 

We slept here for the night.

Syria – Damascus

Damascus is the heart of Syria. It is a city of almost two million. I spent a considerable amount of time here. Like many big cities in developing countries, a good bit of it is noisy, crowded, and polluted. I’m not a big fan of large cities in the poorer parts of the world, but like many cities you can uncover quite a bit of gems. Damascus is one of the oldest inhabited cities in the world and there is a tremendous amount of history. These photos were back in May and June of 2011, before the war. Images below are clickable.

Historic Damascus

Ummayad Mosque

Markets:

At the Hotel. A Dutch, French, and two Brits. We didn’t know each other before and became friends.

Same hotel. I came back to Damascus in June after a four week stint in Lebanon. Below are a group of Chinese backpackers:

Just outside the hotel, a fairly liberal youth scene. Many are college students:

Pro-Assad Rally in June

Christian Quarters

Children’s Clothing Shop

Old Detroit iron

Syria – Castles and Ancient Ruins

Me and a guy from the hotel decided to head towards the Krak des Chevaliers castle and other ancients ruins just east of Hama. We arranged a driver to take us to these places. He couldn’t speak good English so it was difficult to know what we were looking at.

The Krak des Chevaliers castle is considered among the best preserved in the world. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site. Each of the photos are expandable.

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Newsweek – March 11th – Amazon Bans Holocaust “Denier” Books

My top news tweets from the past seven days. (Note: Images may not show up in Firefox)

The biggest news of the week is Amazon’s decision to ban a number of Holocaust revisionism books. Amazon has come under pressure from numerous Jewish groups. They finally caved under pressure.

Today Amazon, the huge, Seattle-based online book distributor, has removed from sale “dangerous” books authored by Dr. Arthur R. Butz of Northwestern University, Carlo Mattogno of Italy, and other eminent dissident scholars who dare to ask scientific and technical questions about the operation of alleged homicidal gas chambers in Auschwitz. These heretics have trespassed on the sacred liturgy of Holocaustianity and their troubling treatises must be forbidden so as to preserve the holiness of World War II dogma.
Amazon has been selling these and similar books for years, but in the past 20 months rabbis and the Yad Vashem “Holocaust” museum have pressured Amazon to remove these and cognate titles. Moreover, Amazon’s owner, Jeff Bezos, purchased the Washington Post and fashioned it into a beachhead of Left wing orthodoxy. The process may have politicized and neutralized his formerly Libertarian instincts.
Books advocating Satanism and sodomy, and denying the Allied holocaust against German civilians, and the Israeli holocaust against the Palestinians, continue to be sold by Amazon.
The censorship is conducted under the rubric of “fighting hatred” and “combatting anti-Semitism.” But this is just special pleading. Books evincing hatred for Germans, Arabs, Iranians and white southern “deplorables” are all on offer at Amazon, as are books denying that Jesus Christ rose from the dead. So it all depends on whose ox is being gored. As many of you know, there’s one sacred cow that is more equal than others. Its name is the Golden Calf.

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Syria – Hama

(Continued from “My Journey Through Syria in 2011 – Aleppo“)

I spent a few nights in Hama, arriving from Damascus by bus. Again the time period was May of 2011. I intended to stop here to take a day trip to the well-known Crac des Chevaliers castle just west of Hama. At the hotel there was just one other tourist, a young man from Japan. The hotel owner spoke fluent English and was really helpful in pointing out places of interest in the area. There were curfews after about 9 PM due to rising tensions. This was around the beginning of the disaster that would soon unfold over Syria. There were no violence, protests, or rallies in Hama at the time – just an atmosphere of concern. There had been skirmishes in Daraa, which is in the southwestern portion of the country, that had killed scores of people. The owner was more cautious about the events going on unlike the owner of the hotel in Aleppo where I stayed previously. The Aleppo hotel owner had little concern about rising tensions and just brushed it off as something temporary.

The town of Hama had a sad history. Back in 1982 the elder Assad, Hafez, ordered the army to come into Hama and take on the Muslim Brotherhood which was opposed to the government. It was a bloody battle that killed thousands of citizens and destroyed much of the historic city center. Some remnants still remain however:

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Newsweek – March 4th Edition

My top news tweets from the past seven days. (Note: Images may not show up in Firefox)

http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-39142260

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Palmyra Syria in 2011

Palmyra has (had) among the world’s greatest ruins of the Roman Empire. I stayed in Palmyra for three nights. This was in mid-May of 2011. I arrived from Hama. During my entire stay, I saw just one other foreign tourist, who was from Germany. I basically had Palmyra for myself. There was a lot of hiking as Palmyra was a large site. Most shots below were taken with a Nikon D300. I used a Bogen tripod for a lot of evening shots.

I stayed in this hotel while visiting Palmyra. It was right next to the sights. The town was small and seemed to be built specifically for the tourist industry, which had suffered since 9/11. Sadly, much of Palmyra now lies in ruins.

zp1120842

May 14th, 2011 (images are clickable)

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